Beaman’s Reciprocal Artifacts opens

Reciprocal Artifacts, an exhibition and installation of research focused on interdisciplinary computational design practices from Michael Leighton Beaman (Critic, Interior Architecture) and Zaneta Hong (ID, 03) opened at the University of Cincinnati’s Aronoff Center on Oct. 22nd. The work which was produced with Interior Architecture student Ru Chen and Architecture student Iok Wong was funded by a summer RISD Bridge Grant, Harvard University Faculty Research Grant, and Beta-Field.

Reciprocal Artifacts is a series of design investigations focused on generating topological and material reciprocity between anthropocentric and non-anthropocentric spatial ontologies within a single artifact. Expanding on the role of the artifact as both, indexical of and emergent from the circumstances leading to its formation, this research posits that artifacts are more than a vestigial product of expansive processes at work. They are the means by which relationships between these circumstances and processes find expression. Reciprocity, between multiple agents or systems, is the degree to which each can perturb or irritate the environment of another, eliciting transformative responses and adaptations. Reciprocal artifacts are formed through mutual perturbations that generate integrated and coevolutionary effects.

Exhibition Gallery (Reciprocal Artifacts research in Background)

Exhibition Gallery (Reciprocal Artifacts research in Background)

1 of 90 Artifacts / 1 of 24 3D printed

1 of 90 Artifacts / 1 of 24 3D printed

Installation Detail 01

Installation Detail 01

Installation Detail 02

Installation Detail 02